2.1

There really are jobs for graduates

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Communication and the ease of it today is great but it has a huge downside. There has been so much doom and gloom, reports dominated by redundancies and companies going out of business that this has affected the new graduate workforce of the UK. They believe there are no jobs so they are not job hunting – so instead even more are going travelling or taking up post graduate study.

The rationale being that come 2010 – when they return to the job market things will be better when it comes to jobs. But this is just not the case.

So many finalists are not applying that many of the big firms still have vacanies to fill – so there are jobs out there now! Taking on the costs of a post graduate degree just to put off job huting is an expensive mistake.  Employers wants graduates with real world, work based skills not more academic knowledge. And come 2010 there will be another 300,000 graduates leaving University to compete against for jobs. 

So what’s the message? If I were a finalist today or a graduate from last year, knowing what I know, I would apply to as many companies as I could and if I did not secure the job I want this summer, I would get work experience and apply again for next year – as that work experience will help me stand out for the rest.

Looking beyond the 2.1

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After 3 years of work the report came back last year from the Burgess Group that the degree classification system would stay largely the same but with the addition of a HEAR – Higher Education Acheivement Record – to give a fuller view of each graduate and their time at University. This HEAR sounds to me like more paperwork for the academics, which being ordinary people, they will want to find ways to get it completed as fast as possible or find ways to avoid doing it directly themselves.

A great alternative idea I read about today (suggested by Prof Mantz Yorke) talks about ‘acheivement claims’ where essentailly the students do the work themselves making a claim for their degree classification by presenting why they feel they have satisfied the aims of their course. Thus putting the student in much more control of the process and getting them, very importantly, to reflect on what they have learned from all their time at University and it’s value. This skills of ‘reflection’ will stand them in great stead for their job hunting as they will be able to much more strongly articulate what they as an individual have to offer (that is different) rather than expecting a 2.1 to do all the talking for them. 

Sadly I fear like too many great ideas little will come of it but I know I will introduce this to our assessment of graduates and perhaps from little acorns…..