schools

How do we help more young people to ‘succeed’ at school and college?

Posted on Updated on

A recent article from the head of an all girls school, made the point that we need to move away from obsessing  about getting A grades and that a B or C was good too. Her point being that not getting A grades led young people to feel they have failed or to not even try if they felt they would not get an A.

This got me thinking…

If as a student, they fairly naturally do well academically, that that success alone will help motivate them to do more and do better – i.e. strive for those A grades. But what about those for whom academic success does not come so naturally? What is the motivation for them to do better? Telling them ‘they might get an A if they try really hard’, or worse still, just be told ‘you have to do well at school or college if you want to get a good job’?! But if they don’t know what a good job is or are not excited by that thought then it seems we run a risk of them then disengaging. And with a generation who are increasingly vocal in asking ‘why?’ and challenging convention, when they do not get that success, many will start to question what is the point, or in the immortal words of Catherine Tate’s ‘character Lauren Cooper’ … ‘am I bovvered’?

So how can they be better inspired?

Young people need to know much earlier about the different jobs available and be excited by them. It is unlikely disengaged young people are going to be excited by dry academic subject matter, but the application of that subject matter and what ‘cool’ jobs it can be used in stands much more chance of inspiring them to then bother and do well in their education.

In short they need to be shown how what they learn can be applied in the real world of work – not just learning for learning sake.

We, as an organisation, have seen very recently a great example of this, with an unengaged student in an FE college, who was not performing well and had low attendance rates but through the experience given to him in one of our SPACEs, engaging with employers and the opportunities in the world of work, his attendance rate moved to 100% and his performance significantly increased. And why? Because he had a motivation and reason to bother!SPACE_Logo_FINAL_BlueWe have seen this too with our Bright Futures School Societies, where a student who was struggling with confidence and to achieve in the classroom, but by engaging with the society activity and employers, his performance and impact grew significantly.

In short we run a high risk of not maximising the potential of many young people who have great untapped potential, if we expect them to do well at school and college because that is what we expect them to do. We need to invest much more time showing them how their education can be used in exciting careers that previously they just did not know or were bothered about.

What apprentices bring that graduates ought to…?

Posted on

There has been a lot of talk in the media about the word ‘apprentice’ and that it still harks back to the old days of what apprenticeships were, as opposed to the huge variety of different apprenticeships today. So should it be given another name as it still has negative connotations?
This may make you think again, it has certainly got me to alter my view…

Following the recent AGR Student Development Conference and various discussions I had there with other delegates I am wondering whether an individual seeing themselves as an ‘apprentice’ as opposed to a ‘graduate’ could actually make an individual more attractive to employers, and here is why….

When an individual starts an apprenticeship they know they are at the beginning of their journey, they have lots of learn; need lots of training and will have to work hard and as they progress on this journey they will become more and more useful and valuable to your employer. As their usefulness grows their career moves forward and salary with it.

Whereas still too many graduates on landing their first graduate job (especially when it is a formal graduate programme) believe they have arrived, they’ve ‘made it’ and their career will ‘happen’. Becoming a graduate may be the end of the academic learning journey, but it is the beginning of the next journey of learning to become valuable for, and really contributing into, their employers’ organisation.

And so why does this ‘entitlement’ attitude still occur with so many?
1. Something (and don’t ask me what it is!) happens to students at University to make them believe this; that they are special in some way (I will be honest it did for me and it came as quite a shock that I was in no way special –yet!)
2. So much of the recruitment advertising and marketing attracting students to formal graduate programmes talks about ‘future leaders’ and has case studies of current Main Board Directors who started as graduates and achieved this in record time, with not enough focus on what those now Board Directors did to achieve this (especially focusing on the attitude they had to demonstrate to get to that position)

I know that individuals, who land places on formal graduate programmes are ambitious & have significant debt so need their career and thus earnings to move upwards as fast as possible, but it does seem to me the ‘attitude’ of working for it, the need to be constantly learning and improving their skills can and often is lost.

Being an apprentice, in part, means ‘I need to learn to become useful’, so employers will need to make that investment but that investment will be falling on fertile ground because the apprentice has joined the organisation to learn, whereas too many of those on (expensive) graduate programmes still just expect all that training as a matter of course and forget why it is being given to them.

I am not saying recruit apprentices and not graduates, I believe both are and can be hugely valuable, but with graduate programmes perhaps some thought can be given to the recruitment messages being used, and with the activity employers do on campus (with our Bright Futures Societies, for example) as opposed to yet more CV & Interview workshops, why not share insights into what it takes to succeed when they get into the work place?

The Future for Employability…Personal Responsibility?

Posted on Updated on

The latest AGR magazine (http://www.agr.org.uk/Graduate-Recruiter) has an article from Paul Redmond, Director of Employability at the University of Liverpool, ‘Dancing in the Dark’ which makes some key points:

– University is about learning to think, develop opinions, process information and grow as a person but it is also about work AND study.
– The Careers Services ‘task is to prepare students for the world of work, while employers provide the opportunities’. But this is not enough, he says, employability cannot be done to people (a point I have been making for years), ‘students have to engage and take responsibility’.
(I agree with both his points, by the way!)

And not by chance, employers want to hire graduates who will also take responsibility, in this case for their personal & professional development, their career and their future – in essence employers want their new ’emergent talent’ to take a lead and drive their own futures.

This ‘taking of responsibility’ it would seem is thus an agreed key theme and attribute that students need.

It is for this reason I am so passionate about our Bright Futures Societies, in Universities and Schools. Through these Societies students are taking responsibility for their employability and taking a lead on what they do when it comes to careers, skills and their future for their peers.

However does ‘taking responsibility and taking a lead’ get the profile at University that it clearly needs to? Through our work in schools, we hear more and more about ‘student leadership’ and the Schools that are establishing Bright Futures student Societies, see what a great opportunity for student leadership the Society presents. For some reason I just don’t hear that message as strongly at University. The University ‘Experience’ absolutely provides huge amounts of opportunity to take responsibility & to a lead but it seems that the important trait is not highlighted enough and made much of.

Students know that to get good jobs they need to demonstrate key skills such as team work, communication, flexibility etc, but do they realise how important ‘taking responsibility’ will make on their futures?

The Future of Careers Advice for young people…more of the same?

Posted on

Teenagers need face to face careers advice, according to a recent piece of research – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-22771846, not sure we needed some research to tell us that! But when we think of this face to face advice we probably think of a careers advisor sitting down with a student to talk about their ‘future’ but is this model really what the Skills Minister Matthew Hancock says is an “ambitious new path for how careers guidance needs to progress” and thus the future for careers advice and support that young people really need?

And please don’t tell me it is a surprise that only 1% of teenagers picked up the phone to call about careers advice – according to the same article. Most teenagers understandably have little or no idea as to the range of careers available to them – let alone what they need to do to secure a start in such a career and to expect them to have the courage, confidence or initiative to pick up the phone and speak to a total stranger (unless instructed to by their parents!) seems to be an out of touch (and dare I say it, cheap) idea.

And why is there this obsession in expecting these ‘careers advisors’ to provide support to the millions of young people who need it? There are no where near enough careers advisors to do this nor can they possibly be expected to know the full range of career options available to young people. It is simply a model that cannot work in terms of helping the numbers of young people who need help, support, direction, inspiration, motivation…the list goes on.

All of us ‘don’t know what we don’t know’ and young people are no different. They do not know the extent of careers are out there nor what skills & abilities they need to offer to secure such a future career. And on the whole they do not know how to find out or indeed when they should start finding out. Add to that for most young people they believe ‘they have plenty of time to worry about careers later’, the issue of students engagement in this issue is key and an often overlooked (certainly by the media).

These insights and information need to be brought to the students and by an informed group which are the employers themselves. They know the range of careers they offer and they know what they look for when they hire, so let’s make the employers the ‘careers insight providers’ and the Careers Advisors the drivers of career strategy within schools and colleges & it is they who forge the collaborations with employers and other external groups, they are not the sole deliverers – as is beginning to happen in HE. Employers need to draw on their recent (inspiring) hires more to go into schools and Colleges who not long ago were where the students are now to tell their story, share their insights and knowledge.

And to give a different slant on the ‘delivery model’ rather than rely on over stretched, or as this recent article shows, part time careers advisors to make this all happen, why not empower the students themselves to play their part & make some of this happen for themselves. We, at Bright Futures, have begun doing this already through our Student Societies and find that by giving students this responsibility and drawing on their energy and creativity some exciting events and interactions take place which engage more students and importantly give the young people the greater insights they need to make good decisions about their future.

In the end it is the young people themselves that should be at the centre and heart of careers advice, not the policies, reports, nor the fine words but action and a new type of action that approaches this key issue in a new way.

Is University a ‘hurdle’ to getting a great career?

Posted on Updated on

Whilst at a great 6th Form College last week where I was meeting the committee members of our next Bright Futures School Society one of the committee members described university as one of the ‘hurdles’ she needed to get over in order that she secure a great career.
This struck me as both highly insightful and sad.

Going to University should surely be seen first & foremost as a powerful and worthwhile experience that should be made the most of, not either an obstacle to be overcome or an necessary activity for a great career.

It would seem that the all round value of higher education is being lost and students thus before they come to university will focus on just overcoming this hurdle – is this really what we want their attitude to be?

Universities & employers need to tackle this issue by getting the message to students in secondary education that employers want that good degree in their future hires but also want students to take advantage of all the other opportunities university offers (socially and developmentally). Otherwise students will go into Higher Education focusing on getting that degree as efficiently as possible and miss out (or leave until too late) all the other experiences university offers that employers increasing are demanding from their graduates.

So coming back to our savvy committee member who asked the question in the first place… she wanted to know about the other ‘hurdles’ she needed to overcome. They include such things as getting a broad range of work experience; developing key skills and a clear understanding of the career they want; examples of volunteering; the list goes on. University life can provide all these things but students need to know that before university so they can set out to acquire them from year 1 at university rather than finding out too late, when they start getting job rejections in their final year or worst still when they leave and find many ‘hurdles’ still in front of them.

How much employer engagement with students makes a difference?

Posted on Updated on

According to a recent report published by United Futures related to the impact that student engagement with employers can make for both the students and organisations, it states:

“The most promising evidence relates to the impact on young people’s employment prospects and earning potential. A UK study found that, after controlling for other influences, four per cent of young people who had experienced four or more employer engagement activities were not in education, employment and training (NEETs), compared to 26% of those who had no experience of employer engagement (Mann 2011).”

The same study showed that each employer engagement activity was correlated with a four per cent increase in wages (c.£750).

So, as an employer just 4 engagement activities (and it does not all have to be with your with your organisation) with potential recruits produces more employable young people.

And for young people seeking employment that level of enagement does not just make you more employable but also increases your earning potential.

Food for thought?

PS If you want a copy of the research just drop me a line and I will forward you the link