‘Who gets the best jobs?’

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A recent programme on BBC2 ‘who gets the best jobs’ was making the point that the best jobs are being snapped up by an increasingly small gene pool of privileged, well connected families.

Whether or not this is true or not is not something I want to debate here. My instinct is that life has always been a bit like this with the fortunate seemingly getting ahead more easily. I am not sure this will ever change but what I do know is that being well connected and having a good network makes a difference both when starting a career and throughout it.

So, a great network makes a real difference. This applies to students & graduates seeking to get a great job BUT is also is true for employers seeking to hire the best talent, the better your network on campus the better talent you secure.

So how do you become well connected (if your family or organisation are not!?) It comes down to something that is core to both me and to my organisation and that is…to take personal responsibility for making things happen. If you are not born well connected with a great network (like most of us!) there is nothing to stop you becoming well connected & making one. Just get out there and meet people both face to face and online (just look at what Justin Bieber did through YouTube!), not forgetting to follow up with them afterwards & keep in touch (through things like blogs)

The Bright Futures Society would be a great, personal example of the value of a great network and how being proactive with your current network helps you keep growing your network

  • I was approached to take over the running of the Bright Futures Society (previously SIS) as a result of the network I had built for myself on campus

 

  • I saw the Society as a great tool for students to build a personal network and become well connected. We do not care what University students are at, what their route to University was but if they want to take responsibility for themselves and their career then involvement in the Society will really help.

 

  • Running the Society has helped me take another huge step forward in terms of my network and being well connected. I have met some great people through it both students and corporates who I would not have met (so easily) without it

 

We have 3 guiding principles at Bright Futures when it comes to being successful.

  1. Know what you want (know your goals)
  2. Build a mastermind group i.e. surround yourself with people who can help you achieve what you want (a network)
  3. Take personal responsibility – get off your ****side and make it happen!

 

And adopting these 3 principles will ensure you successfully build a network of well-connected people and so become well-connected yourself.

Join the Bright Futures Society as a student and we will help you become well-connected; get involved as a graduate recruiter and we will help you grow your network of talented undergraduates & graduates.

So who gets the best jobs…?

“The people who get on in this world are the people, who get up and look for the circumstances they want, and, if they can’t find them, make them” George Bernard Shaw

This is my favourite quote. You may not start out well connected but there is nothing to stop you becoming well connected.

P.S. I have just heard one of our Bright Futures Committee members has secured a job with one of our clients. She was rejected on paper but as a result of her ‘Bright Futures’ network and meeting that client face to face & impressing them she was then put onto their selection process and ultimately offered a job on their graduate programme. Everybody wins!

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